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the ocean? >> guest: there was a children law right in england that allowed people to have firearms for self-defense and other purposes, and that right common law right, traveled across the ocean with the colonists and they needed the guns here, whereas in england mostly they didn't. and so people soon came to have an enormous facility and knowledge of firearms, and of course, as we all know, it produced the result of victory against the most powerful military country in the world at the time in the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that. and again, think people get hazy views on history, and it comes from movies or tv. when we had the revolutionary period, what was the role of guns? in this militias. >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a whole lot of the militia. he grossed about it at times but also made remarks that allowed as how the militia was a useful thing to have. he couldn't have bit the continental army without the existence of the militias and people who had been in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, a
and that right common law right the colonists the needed the guns here whereas most england they didn't, and so people soon came to have an enormous facility and knowledge of firearms and of course as we all know it proves the result of victory against the most powerful military country in the world with of the revolutionary war. >> host: i want to talk about that a little bit, and again i think people get different views in history, and it comes from movies or tv a lot of times. but when we have the revolutionary period what was the role of guns in the militia or these requirements that we talk about? >> guest: george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he growled about a lot of times but also made some remarks that aloud how the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certa
is that the law and order and it's hard to keep up with that if everyone is pulling out of pistol. >> host: even in shootout at ok corral. >> guest: is started up because site claims it had been arrested or accused of violating the local ordinance that for big carrying a firearm around town. incidentally the understanding of work on race were four began to evolve in the century and in particular this. in the early 19th century was a big problem with tools between gentlemen. the most famous is between aaron burr and hamilton. but this tooling was fairly common, but it was frowned upon and could be prosecuted and burr had to keep it around to avoid being prosecuted. and so, one of the means that the people who insisted on being able to settle matters of honor on the spot dirty to do in the early 19th century was carry small pistols concealed. this was seen by gentlemen as cowardly. if you cannot be a man can wear your pistol on your hip and don't sneakily carry it around and say turcotte. so that began to change. >> host: was still holds true today. most places don't have restrictions on open carr
to try to get wallace off the ticket. it was run by two people, the national chair that france and laws machine that got true many elected in 1940 and ended pauli was a california millionaire that said i went into politics and realized it was cheap to elect a new congress than to buy at the old way and he is going to get indicted for treason. >> so, they decide they're going to try to resolve delete user count him to convince him that he can't get free elective wallace is on the tickets. we are not denying that. in 1941 when henry made his famous speech saying the 20th century is to be the american sentry and the united states is and to dominate the world economically and politically and militarily and culturally. he responded to that as vice president and me the speech. they had the people's revolution in the tradition of the french, the american, the latin american and russian revolution he called for ending colonialism and imperialism and the economic exploitation spreading the fruit of science and technology are not of the world and the southern segregationist was the leading spokes
died, and clinton passes the law that basically gives the opportunity for bush to go further with it when bush, after 9/11, with the invasion of iraq. so, we see a continuum. that's part of the point we're making. it's not democrats versus republicans. foreign policy is bipartisan and we see it as this -- these lines running from 1898 -- you can say 1846 with mexico -- but we're tracing from 1899 up to iraq and afghanistan and yemen, and to the current administration. >> a lot like great historian williams who argues empire is a way of life. you call your book "untold history of the united states now now and in some ways williams -- >> we're following that. that's been on -- standing on on the showereds of a lot of great historian. this is not really untold to university audiences. it's untold in the public schools and untold to the popular u.s.a. audience. some people get their history from television and movies other than oliver's, and we're trying to challenge they that americans don't know much history. the national record card says u.s. high school seniors are worse in
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5